European Initiative on Security Studies 2018 (archive)

Table of contents:

2018 EISS Conference

The Founding Director of the European Initiative on Security Studies (EISS) is Hugo Meijer, European University Institute (EUI). Its Academic Board includes Hugo Meijer (EUI), Alice Pannier (Johns Hopkins University) and Olivier Schmitt (University of Southern Denmark). The EISS is part of the Association for the Study of War and Strategy (AEGES).

The 2018 EISS conference is organized in partnership with the Center Thucydides and the Center for Studies and Research on Administrative and Political Science (CERSA) of Paris 2. It will be held on June 21-22, 2018. Participating universities interested in hosting future conferences are encouraged to contact eissnetwork@gmail.com.

Location of the conference:

The conference will take place at the University Panthéon-Assas (Assas campus): 92 rue d’Assas, 75006 Paris. Metro Stations: Port-Royal, Vavin, Saint-Placide and Rennes, Notre-Dame-des-Champs or RER.

The location of the cocktail on the 22nd is: University Panthéon-Assas (Panthéon campus): 12 place du Panthéon, 75005 Paris

Map:

(click here to access a bigger version)

Registration and fees

Please complete the registration form and its mandatory fields by clicking here. Because of space constraints, only a maximum of 3 (three) persons per institution are allowed to register, including the speakers.

The registration fee for this year is 20 euros. You will find all the necessary information for payment in the registration form.

Program

Pdf version: EISS-programme-2018.

For speakers: no formal paper is required but speakers can circulate their paper or PPT presentation if they want to.

              June 21 Thursday
Amphithéâtre 1
9h30-10h15

 

Opening Remarks

Hugo Meijer, European University Institute, Italy

 

Keynote Speech

Beatrice Heuser, University of Glasgow, United Kingdom

Salle 214 Salle 315
10h30-12h Defense Cooperation

Chair: Ulrich Krotz, European University Institute, Italy

Collective Security and Strategic (In)Stability in Cyberspace

Chair: Frédérick Douzet, University Paris-8, France

12h-14h Lunch
14h-15h30 Military Interventions

Chair: Peter Viggo Jacobsen, University of Southern Denmark, Denmark

Private Actors and Conflict

Chair: Elke Krahmann, University of Kiel, Germany

15h30-16h Coffee Break
16h-17h30 Alliances and Military Innovation

Chair: Alexander Lanoszka, City, University of London, United Kingdom

Asymmetric Threats, Non-State-Actors and Domestic Politics

Chair: Silvia D’Amato, Scuola Normale Superiore, Firenze

 

17h30-19h Military  Technology

Chair: Mauro Gilli, ETH-Zurich, Switzerland

WMD Non-Proliferation and Arms Control

Chair: Målfrid Braut-Hegghammer, University of Oslo, Norway

 

             June 22 Friday
9h30-11h Europe and Nuclear Deterrence in the Era of Putin, Trump and Brexit

Chair: Benjamin Hautecouverture, Foundation for Strategic Research (FRS), Paris

Terrorism and Counter-Terrorism

Chair: Isabelle Duijvesteijn, Leiden University, Netherlands

11h-12h30 European Grand Strategy

Chair: Marina Henke, European University Institute, Italy

Hybrid Threats, Criminal Insurgencies and the Path Toward Multi-Domain Security

Chair: David Garcia Cantalapiedra, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Spain

12h30-14h00 Lunch
14h-15h30 Intelligence

Chair: Antonio Díaz, University of Cádiz, Spain

Arms Procurement and Transfers

Chair: Matthew Uttley, King’s College London, United Kingdon

15h30-16h00 Coffee Break
16h00-17h30 Democratization and Politicization of Military Issues in Europe

Chair: Delphine Deschaux-Dutard, University of Grenoble Alpes, France

Security and Deterrence in Asia

Chair: John Nilsson Wright, University of Cambridge, United Kingdom

 

  Amphithéâtre 1
18h00-18h30 Concluding Session

Open Discussion on the EISS

18h30-20h Cocktail

Appartement Décanal, 12 place du Panthéon, 75005 Paris

Other Key Information on the EISS 2018

  • Contact: eissnetwork@gmail.com
  • Maximum n° of participants per university: 3
  • Travel/accommodation expenses: No funding is provided by the EISS. Applicants are advised to seek funding for travel/accommodation from their home institution
  • EISS Participating Universities: Each participating university covers the travel/accommodation of its scholars
  • Length of presentation: 10 min
  • There will be a participation fee of 20 euros

 

Panels description

Defense Cooperation

Chair: Ulrich Krotz, European University Institute, Italy

1. Protégé Panic: Alliance Fears and the Trump Administration
Alexander Lanoszka, City, University of London, United Kingdom; Zack Cooper, Center for Strategic and International Studies, United States
2. Strategies for Obtaining United Nations Security Council Approval
Stefano Recchia, University of Cambridge, United Kingdom
3. Small State, Big Impact? Iceland’s First National Security Policy
Page Wilson, University of Iceland, Iceland; Audur Ingolfsdottir, University of Akureyri, Iceland
4. Japan’s Defense Partnerships in the Asia-Pacific: Motivations, Constituent Components and Limitations
Elena Atanassova-Cornelis, University of Antwerp, Belgium
5. Nordic and Nordic-Baltic Defense Cooperation after the Ukraine Crisis
Ida Maria Oma, Norwegian Institute for Defense Studies, Norway

Collective Security and Strategic (In)Stability in Cyberspace

Chair: Frédérick Douzet, University Paris-8, France

1. Cyberspace and the Recourse to Offensive Actions
Stéphane Taillat, St Cyr Military Academy, France
2. Cyber Attacks as a Threat to International Peace and Security: The Action of the UN Security Council
Annachiara Rotondo, University of Naples, Italy
3. The Impact of Academic Research on States’ Approach and Practice on the International Law Applicable to Cyber Operations
François Delerue, IRSEM, France
4. International Legality of Cyberweapons
Joanna Kulesza, University of Lodz, Poland
5. Chinese Perspectives on Security in Cyberspace
Rogier Creemers, University of Leiden, Netherlands

Military Interventions

Chair: Peter Viggo Jakobsen, University of Southern Denmark, Denmark

1. Russia’s Military Intervention in Georgia, Ukraine and Syria: An Analysis of Russia’s Strategic Culture, Perceptions and Relative National Power
Domitilla Sagramoso, King’s College London, United Kingdom; Simon Saradzhyan, Harvard University; and Nabi Abdullaev, Control Risks, United States
2. Brexit and the Future of European Military Coalitions
Katharina Wolf, European University Institute, Italy
3. The Recurring Logic of French Military Interventions in Africa and their Implications for Barkhane and the Sahel
Nathaniel Powell, Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies, Switzerland
4. Military Interventions, Liberal Militarism and Republican Restraints on Power
Kevin Blachford, University of Bristol, United Kingdom
5. Can and Want. But How? Russia’s Approaches to Use of Military Force in International Relations
Katarzyna Zysk, Norwegian Institute for Defense Studies, Norway

Private Actors and Conflict

Chair: Elke Krahmann, University of Kiel, Germany

1. A Public and Private Norm for Force? Authorities’ Assemblages and Re-Specification of State in the International Control of Private Security
Cyril Magnon-Pujo, University Lumière Lyon 2, France
2. Analyzing Private Military and Security Contractors’ Power in Multi-Stakeholder Initiatives
Berenike Prem, University of Kiel, Germany
3. The Anti-Mercenary Norm and United Nations’ Use of Private Military and Security Companies
Oldrich Bures and Jeremy Meyer, Metropolitan University Prague, Czech Republic
4. The Insurgents’ Right to Surrender and New Military Technologies: The Risk of Lawfare via the European Court of Human Rights
Philippe Bou Nader, Panthéon-Assas University (Paris II), France
5. Redefining Statehood in Conflict: Local Militias, Transnational Actors and Security Governance in Mali
Edoardo Baldaro, University of Naples, Italy

Alliances and Military Innovation

Chair: Alexander Lanoszka, City, University of London, United Kingdom

1. Testing Traditional Alliances Ability to Contain China’s Rise
Claudia Astarita, Sciences Po, France
2. All Options on the (Latency) Table: The Impact of Carrots and Sticks on Nuclear Latency Roll-Back
Rupal Mehta, University of Nebraska-Lincoln; Molly Berkemeier, Texas A & M University; Paige Price Cone, University of Chicago; and Rachel Whitlark, Georgia Institute of Technology, United States
3. The British Army, Modern Fire and Basic Military Training: 1871-1918
Jean-Philippe Miller-Tremblay, EHESS, France
4. Italian Military Transformation: Defense Industry Trends and National Leadership
Marco Valigi, University of Bologna, Italy; Gabriele Natalizia, Link Campus University, Italy
5. Consequences of Military Technology Evolutions on the Rare-Metal Needs: Assessment of the Supply Security
Raphaël Danino-Perraud, Laboratoire d’Économie d’Orléans (LEO) / Bureau des Recherches Géologiques et Minières (BRGM), France

Asymmetric Threats, Non-State Actors and Domestic Politics

Chair: Silvia D’Amato, University of Florence, Italy

1. Ballot Boxes and Surgical Strikes: Indian National Security Choices in Electoral Campaigns
Karthika Sasikumar, San Jose State University, United States
2. Understanding and Countering Violent Extremism: Exploring the Discursive Construction of Transnational CounterTerrorism Programming at the Security-Development Nexus
Ann-Kathrin Rothermel, University of Potsdam, Germany
3. How Foreign State Support Affects Rebel Groups: Evidence from Angola
Quint Hoekstra, University of Manchester, United Kingdom
4. Migrant Rescuing as Organized Hypocrisy. EU Maritime Missions Offshore Libya between Humanitarianism and Border Control
Eugenio Cusumano, Leiden University, Netherlands
5. Reconceptualizing the Military Assistance: Evaluating Norwegian Support to Building Integrity in the Defense Institutions in Western Balkans
Islam Jusufi, Epoka University, Albania

Military Technology 

Chair: Mauro Gilli, ETH-Zurich, Switzerland

1. Reconciling the Irreconcilable? Autonomous Weapons and the Laws of Targeting
Arthur P.B. Laudrain, Centre for Doctoral Training in Cyber Security,University of Oxford
2. Spacepower in the International System: Measuring Power in Heaven
Bleddyn Bowen, University of Leicester, United Kingdom
3. Technological Singularity and War: Artificial Intelligence and the Radical Transformation of Human-Machine Relations
Raluca Csernaton, Charles University Prague, Czech Republic
4. Why is Spin-in Not Yet a Win-Win? Obstacles to Technology Transfer of Autonomy from the Civilian to the Military Sector
Maaike Verbruggen, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Belgium
5. Towards a European ‘Offset Strategy’? Procurement and Emerging Technologies
Daniel Fiott, European Union Institute for Security Studies (EUISS), France

WMD Non-Proliferation and Arms Control

Chair: Målfrid BrautHegghammer, University of Oslo, Norway

1. The 2017 Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons: Moral Idealism or Transformative Change of the Global Nonproliferation Regime?
Margarita Petrova, Institut Barcelona d’Estudis Internacionals, Spain
2. Schrodinger’s Panda – Quantum Technology in China
Raymond Wang, Middlebury Institute of International Studies/Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne,
France/United Kingdom
3. How to Think About Nuclear Crises
Mark Bell, University of Minnesota, United States
4. Breathing New Life into NPT? Likely Impact of the Ban Treaty on the NPT Review Process
Michal Onderco, Erasmus University Rotterdam, Netherlands
5. Nuclear Alliances: Strategies of Extended Nuclear Deterrence and the Pursuit of Hegemony
Eliza Gheorghe, Yale University, United States

Europe and Nuclear Deterrence in the Era of Putin, Trump and Brexit

Chair: Benjamin Hautecouverture, Foundation for Strategic Research (FRS), Paris

1. The Atlantic Alliance’s Cohesion at Risk? Current Euro-Atlantic Challenges Seen through the Lens of the Second Berlin Crisis (1958-1963)
Frédéric Gloriant, École Normale Supérieure, France
2. U.S. END and Nuclear Use: “Finally” a Bipolar Problem
Christine Leah, independent researcher
3. The Resurgence of European Insecurity: Lessons Learned (and Forgotten) from the Euromissile Crisis (1977-1987)
Ilaria Paris, Université Sorbonne Nouvelle Paris 3, France
4. Envisaging Alternatives for Europe’s Nuclear Order
Elmar Hellendoorn, Harvard University, United States
5. Words Matter. Donald Trump and the Credibility of US Extended Nuclear Deterrence
Hiroshi Nakatani, University of Reading, United Kingdom

Terrorism and Counter-Terrorism

Chair: Isabelle Duijvesteijn, Leiden University, Netherlands

1. Rethinking (Counter) Terrorism, the Enemy ‘Within’, Cyber Strategies and Construction of Narratives in the Fight Against Terrorism
Elizabeth Sheppard, Université François Rabelais-Tours, France
2. Into the Vacuum: How the Kurdistan Workers’ Party and Islamic State Insurgencies Exploited the Syrian Civil War and Iraqi Crisis from mid 2014-mid 2017
John Holland-McCowan, King’s College London, United Kingdom
3. The International Systemic Impact of Terrorism: from Sarajevo to 9/11
Bruno Reis, University Institute of Lisbon – ISCTE, Portugal
4. Defining, Labelling, Listing: The Construction of the Terrorist ‘Other’ since the End of the 19th Century
Corentin Sire, Université de Caen, France
5. Influencing the Feeling of Security?
Michael T. Oswald, Free University Berlin, Germany

European Grand Strategy

Chair: Marina Henke, European University Institute, Italy

1. What are the EU’s Grand Strategic Options in Response to American Restraint?
Marina Henke, Northwestern University/European University Institute, Italy; Paul van Hooft,
European University Institute, Italy
2. What Political Forces Shape European Security on the World Stage?
Luis Simón, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Belgium
3. Now End of History: Ruptures and Tectonic Shifts?
Beatrice Heuser, University of Glasgow, United Kingdom
4. European Military Capability Needs in an Age of American Restraint
Mauro Gilli, EHT Zurich, Switzerland
5. Quo Vadimus? U.S.-EU Counter-Terrorism Cooperation in an Age of Uncertainty
Carlotta Minnella, University of Oxford, United Kingdom

Hybrid Threats, Criminal Insurgencies and the Path toward Multi-Domain Security

Chair: David Garcia Cantalapiedra, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Spain

1. Hybrid Threats: Terrorism, Transnational Organized Crime and a New Concept of Security
David Garcia Cantalapiedra, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Spain
2. Organized Crime in Latin-America: How Brazilian Organizations Are Changing the Rules of the Game
Carolina Sampó, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, Argentina
3. Criminal Networks in Africa: a New Door of Latin America Traffics?
Raquel Barras Tejudo, EuroMesco/Carnegie, Lebanon
4. The Blurred Line between Insurgency and Organized Crime in Afghanistan
María Barco Martínez, University of Glasgow, United Kingdom
5. The Crime/Terror Nexus in Europe. Initial Results from a Multi-Method Approach
Daniela Pisolu, Austrian Institute for International Affairs, Austria

Intelligence

Chair: Antonio Díaz, University of Cádiz, Spain

1. Military Intelligence and Top-secret Interrogation Centers in the Second World War
Simona Tobia, Université de Toulouse, France
2. Keeping Secrets: Surveying the Factors Affecting Professional Discretion
Damien Van Puyvelde, University of Glasgow, United Kingdom
3. Intelligence ‘Failure’ and the 2004 Madrid Train Bombings
Frennie Warner, University of Canterbury, New Zealand
4. Hunting Terrorist Suspects: the Role of Police Intelligence in Fighting Terrorism in Europe
Hager Ben Jaffel, King’s College London, United Kingdom
5. Cyber Action Russia and Intelligence
Jamel Metmati, Cyber Chair of Saint-Cyr, France
+ Short presentation by Bob de Graaf, Chair of the European Chapter of IAFIE
(International Association For Intelligence Education)

Arms Procurement and Transfers

Chair: Matthew Uttley, King’s College London, United Kingdom

1. The Metamorphosis of ‘Capability’: British Defense Equipment Support Policy Since 2010
Benoit Giry and Andy Smith, Centre Émile Durkheim, Sciences Po Bordeaux, France
2. Cooperation and Non-Cooperation in European Defence Procurement: the “Italian Job”
Antonio Calcara, Ph.D. Candidate, LUISS, University “Guido Carli” in Rome, Italy
3. Producing Airpower: Neo-Liberalism and Complex Weaponry
Marc R. DeVore, University of St. Andrews, United Kingdom
4. Informal Institutions, Trust and the Design of Privatization
Moritz Weiss, Ph.D. Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich, Germany
5. Arms Procurement, Transfers and Defense Industries as a Means of Gaining Autonomy: The Case of the Gulf States
Emma Soubrier, Université Clermont Auvergne, France

Democratization and Politicization of Military Issues in Europe

Chair: Delphine Deschaux-Dutard, University of Grenoble Alpes, France

1. What [European] Women [Really] Want? A Critical, Feminist Approach to Understanding Gendered Aspects of Public Opinion on European Union’s Security and Defense Policy
Karen Devine, Dublin City University, Ireland
2. Policy Mood and Policy Responsiveness on the EU’s Common Foreign and Security Policy
Pierangelo Isernia and Francesco Olmastroni, University of Siena, Italy
3. Party Political Contestation of Military Interventions
Wolfgang Wagner, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Netherlands
4. It’s the Americans, Stupid… Is it? Understanding the French (Suspect) Plebiscite for European Defense
Cyrille Thiébaut, European University Institute, Italy/Paris 1 CESSP, France
5. An EU Inspired Cloud of Multilateral Antipathy? The British Public and Foreign Policy Attitudes on the Eve of Brexit?
Thomas Scotto, University of Strathclyde, United Kingdom

Security and Deterrence in Asia

Chair: John Nilsson Wright, University of Cambridge, United Kingdom

1. The Evolution of US Alliances in Northeast Asia: Japan and South Korea
Matteo Dian, University of Bologna, Italy
2. US-Chinese Maritime Security and the Consequences for Europe’s Relations with Washington and Beijing
Liselotte Odgaard, Royal Danish Defense College, Denmark
3. Coping with ‘Grey Zone Situations’: Japan’s Strategy in the East China Sea
Cécile Pajon, French Institute of International Relations (IFRI), France
4. A Weapon of the Weak? Cyberwarfare and China’s Threat Perception
Simone Dossi, University of Milan, Italy
5. Consistent Inconsistency: The Unintended Consequences of the US ‘Spoiling’ a Region?
Catherine Jones, University of Warwick, United Kingdom

Pictures

Universities and Research Centers represented at the 2018 EISS Conference

Albania
— Epoka University
Austria
— Austrian Institute for International Affairs
Belgium
— University of Antwerp
— Vrije Universiteit Brussel
Czech Republic
— Charles University Prague
— Metropolitan University Prague
Denmark
— Royal Danish Defense College
— University of Southern Denmark
France
— Auvergne University (Clermont-Ferrand)
— École Normale Supérieure
— European Union Institute for Security Studies
— Foundation for Strategic Research (FRS)
— French Institute of International Relations (IFRI)
— Institute for Strategic Research (IRSEM)
— Laboratoire d’Économie d’Orléans – Bureau des Recherches Géologiques et Minières
— Panthéon-Assas University (Paris II)
— School for Advanced Studies in the Social Sciences (EHESS)
— Sciences Po
— University of Caen
— University of Toulouse
— University François Rabelais-Tours
— University Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne
— University Paris 2 Panthéon-Assas
— University Sorbonne Nouvelle Paris 3
— University Lumière Lyon 2
— University of Grenoble Alpes
— Saint-Cyr Military Academy
— University of Bordeaux
— University Paris-8
Germany
— Free University Berlin
— Ludwig-Maximilians University of Munich
— RWTH Aachen University
— University of Kiel
— University of Potsdam
Iceland
— University of Akureyri
— University of Iceland
Ireland
— Dublin City University
Italy
— European University Institute
— Link Campus University
— LUISS University “Guido Carli”, Rome
— University of Bologna
— University of Florence
— University of Milan
— University of Naples
— University of Siena
Netherlands
— Erasmus University Rotterdam
— Leiden University
— Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam
— University of Amsterdam
Norway
— Norwegian Institute for Defense Studies
— University of Oslo
Poland
— University of Lodz
Portugal
— University Institute of Lisbon – ISCTE
Spain
— EuroMesco
— Instituto Barcelona d’Estudis Internacionals
— Universidad Europea de Madrid
— Universidad Complutense de Madrid
— Universidad de Cádiz
Switzerland
— ETH Zurich/CSS
United Kingdom
— City, University of London
— University of Cambridge
— Chatham House
— King’s College London
— Middlebury Institute of International Studies
— University of St. Andrews
— University of Warwick
— University of Bristol
— University of Manchester
— University of Leicester
— University of Reading
— University of Strathclyde
— University of Glasgow
— University of Oxford
Outside Europe
— Carnegie Middle East Center, Lebanon
— Center for Strategic and International Studies
— Georgia Institute of Technology, USA
— Harvard University, USA
— Northwestern University, USA
— San Jose State University, USA
— School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS), Johns Hopkins University, USA
— Texas A&M University, USA
— University of Canterbury, New Zealand
— University of Chicago, USA
— University of Minnesota, USA
— Universidad Nacional de La Plata, Argentina
— University of Nebraska-Lincoln, USA
— Yale University, USA